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  #11  
Old 02-23-2009, 09:00 AM
munchlet munchlet is offline
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Default Fun with Numbers

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In order for the curve to kick in and get fast outliers, you need sufficient number or percent of solutions.

Also, as new puzzles are added, it will take a while for enough people to solve them to get the fastest time down.
Agree, Maradnu... and was thinking "Law of Large Numbers," so I google'd that and found this enlightening dissertation:

wwwrsphysse.anu.edu.au/~tas110/Teaching/Lectures/L4/Lecture4.pdf

which reminds me:

a) how totally out of my depth I am on this subject, and

b) how I might more productively fill my free time (so called).

For those so inclined... scroll down to this question:

Quote:
Are the ‘extreme outliers’ really extreme in fat tailed processes?
And check back with us when:

a) you understand the answer, or

b) you have developed the requisite fat tail.

So much to learn, so little time!

(I really shoulda saved that dunce cap to my desktop.)

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  #12  
Old 02-23-2009, 09:24 AM
munchlet munchlet is offline
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Default Showing My Age

Quote:
I have since edited my post. Also, in one instance I should have said "over," instead of "under."
Interesting, Bansai, that you edited your post -- correctly -- but not the way I had in mind. Shows how open-ended the writing process can be.

Do you suppose someone might design a crypto-puzzle with multiple correct responses? Rather than the single, determined, one-correct-response style we tackle here...

Just wonderin'. I think I prefer a single correct answer.

Also... I read the message on your buses (sneaking in politics here?) but before that, at first glance, I was hearing a song and it went like this:

Over, under, sideways, down,
(Hey)
Backwards, forwards, square and round.
(Hey)

Who else remembers playing that one on the jukebox?

Andrea
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  #13  
Old 02-26-2009, 06:20 AM
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bansaisequoia bansaisequoia is offline
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Default Two-sided equivocal ambiguity

PHP Code:
Do you suppose someone might design a crypto-puzzle with multiple correct responsesRather than the singledeterminedone-correct-response style we tackle here... 
Munchlet, I'm not sure that's feasible, unless the different possibilities were thought out beforehand. It doesn't seem likely that notable quotables could have the same letter combinations. However, someone did once create a crossword puzzle with two possible solutions for the New York Times. Even then, it was only one line of the 15x15 grid which had 2 different solutions. Read this link for further info:

http://www.crosswordtournament.com/articles/ct0398.htm

And I'd like to recommend that everyone here see the film, "Wordplay," the documentary of the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament, which makes mention of this puzzle. Bob Dole and Bill Clinton both make mention of this particular puzzle in the film.

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  #14  
Old 02-26-2009, 06:37 AM
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Default

A multiple-answer crypto would be plausible - a simple (but nonsensical) example, if I didn't screw it up, would be:

DO YOU LIKE SOLVING CRYPTOS?

... could also end up being solved as ...

DO YOU BECK NOBLEST GRYPHON?

I'd be super impressed if anyone made a fair-sized cryptogram (60-70 letters at least) that could be reworked in multiple, sensible, answers - and not in a cheap way, like changing just one word from BAD to SAD, or something like that.

I loved Wordplay - the CLINTON, BOBDOLE puzzle just blew me away!


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  #15  
Old 02-28-2009, 06:49 PM
munchlet munchlet is offline
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Default That's OK, Pootie...

More often than not...

I do not begin to understand my own posts after I write them!

Life has been... shall we say... stressful. Understatement. One doesn't want to work retail in the present economic situation -- it's bad and getting worse -- so I show up here to let off steam, engage my mind in some neutral fashion. Then back to Life in Hell.

At times Mad Munchlet goes off on a bender (alcohol not required). Off on some tangent or diversion -- diving down an intellectual rabbit hole.

One can only hope that someone somewhere finds these musings and meanderings quasi-informative, diverting or entertaining. Just keep me away from threads where people are having quiet sensible discussions regarding practical matters.

Best regards, Andrea
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  #16  
Old 02-28-2009, 07:16 PM
munchlet munchlet is offline
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Default Committed Puzzleheads

That's how Bret Fetzer at amazon.com describes the target audience for Wordplay, a documentary for crossword solvers as well as curious observers of said species.

Quote:
The linguistic ballet of the crossword puzzle and the obsessive minds that wrestle with them are a source of delight in the charming documentary Wordplay.
Thanks, Bansai, for the heads up here. A must see. Long ago, before I started working Sundays, Will Shortz and his weekly puzzlers on NPR's "Weekend Edition" were a Sunday morning highlight.

Quote:
[Shortz] is the only person in the world to hold a college degree in Enigmatology, the study of puzzles, which he earned from Indiana University in 1974.
Chicago Sun-Times reprints the New York Times crossword (on week days). I can handle Monday's and Tuesday's puzzles... might take a stab at Weds. After that, fuhgeddabout it!

Last edited by munchlet : 02-28-2009 at 07:39 PM.
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  #17  
Old 02-28-2009, 08:06 PM
munchlet munchlet is offline
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Default P.S. Most informative article (1998 revisited)

Please note Bansai's link above: a short [fascinating] bio of Will Shortz, NYT crossword puzzle editor.

The double solution for Election Day, 1996, was absolutely awesome. How ingenious. What talent, first to think of the idea and then design a puzzle around it. All my life I've wanted to think that way but to this day remain relentlessly linear in my thought patterns. What a rut.

Andrea
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  #18  
Old 02-28-2009, 08:57 PM
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Default Multiple answers to crypto

It depends on how much divergence you are looking for. There are puzzles on this site which can have a word or two which could be any one of several words, which make equal sense. This is particularly true where there are words with one or more letters used only once in the puzzle.
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  #19  
Old 03-01-2009, 07:58 AM
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Default pain patches

Hi!

Not very educated in these matters, but I just read about a cancer patient that used patches for pain relief.
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  #20  
Old 03-02-2009, 08:41 AM
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Default Seen it before

I've seen such pain relief patches before, too, momof6. I know they exist. There's even a girl who frequents my bar who has any number of maladies who has them prescribed by her doctors. She has dermal patches that slowly medicate her with oxy-contin, among other things. I only wish they had over the counter patches that would allow ulcer sufferers to take aspirin. Maybe one day.

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